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Anomodon Hook. & Taylor Search in The Plant ListSearch in Index Nominum Genericorum (ING)Search in NYBG Virtual HerbariumSearch in JSTOR Plant ScienceSearch in SEINetSearch in African Plants Database at Geneva Botanical Garden Decrease font Increase font Restore font
 

Published In: Muscologia Britannica 79–80, pl. 3 [near upper right], 22 [upper center left & right]. 1818. (Muscol. Brit.) Name publication detail
 

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Notes     (Last Modified On 3/27/2009)
general taxon notes:
Species of Anomodon usually occur in subtropical and temperate regions. They often grow on tree trunks, rotten wood, or rock surfaces. Their morphological characters are quite variable due to the different habitats. The genus consists of more than 20 species in the world. Nine species and one variety were reported from China (Redfearn et al. 1996). The first record of Anomodon in China might be A. sinensis C. Müll. (C. Müller 1896) from Shaanxi. Later, Brotherus (1907, 1925, 1929), Reimers (1931), C.-Y. Yang (1936), and Potier de la Varde (1937) reported most of the species of the genus from various parts of China. C. Gao (1977) published a new species, A. dentatus, from northeastern China. P.-C. Chen et al. (1978) provided a detailed account of Chinese Anomodon with 2 subgenera and 9 species. Tan et al. (1996) added a new variety, Anomodon solovjowii Laz. var. henanensis B. C. Tan, Boufford & T.-S. Ying. In this study, 9 species, one subspecies, and one variety of Anomodon are treated. We cannot confirm the specimens of Anomodon longifolius (Brid.) Hartm. from Heilongjiang and Jilin reported by C. Gao et al. (1977). Its occurrence in China is questionable.

 

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1. Anomodon Hook. & Taylor 牛舌藓属 niu-she xian shu
Muscol. Brit. 79. 3. 1818.
 
Plants robust, rather rigid, dark green, yellowish green or brownish green, in lax or dense tufts or cushions. Primary stems creeping, secondary stems erect or ascending, remotely and irregularly pinnately branched; branch apices often curved, with leaves remotely arranged and revolute at apex when dry; commonly with stoloniferous branches; paraphyllia absent. Stem leaves similar to branch leaves, ovate or oblong-ovate at the base, rarely with small auricles, suddenly narrowed to a widely lingulate or oblong-lingulate acumen, rarely lanceolate, with a rounded apex, rarely serrate at the apex; leaf margins often undulate or rugose; costa single, mostly ending only a few cells below the apex; leaf cells isomorphic, hexagonal or rounded hexagonal, equally thick-walled, grossly multipapillose or sharply unipapillose; basal median cells usually hyaline along the costa. Dioicous. Perichaetial leaves lanceolate from a sheathing base. Setae slender, up to several centimeters long; capsules cylindrical, shortly cylindrical or ovoid, smooth, or strict when dry; stomata absent or rarely present; annuli mostly differentiated; opercula conical, sometimes beaked; exostome teeth light yellow or brownish yellow, narrowly lanceolate, densely papillose, rarely weakly striate at the base, nodulose or nodules absent; endostome segments pale, finely papillose, well developed or rudimentary, sometimes keeled; basal membrane low; cilia short and weak, rudimentary or lacking. Calyptrae smooth, rarely papillose above.
 
 
 

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1. Plants large, up to 10 cm long; endostome segments ca. 2/3 the length of exostome teeth.. 9. A. viticulosus
1. Plants small to medium-sized, rarely larger; endostome segments mostly rudimentary, rarely ca. 1/2 the length of exostome teeth..............................................................................................2
2. Each leaf cell with a single, setulose papilla............................................................................3
2. Each leaf cell with multipapillae........................................................................................4
3. Plants large; endostome segments short or rudimentary.......................................1. A. abbreviatus
3. Plants medium-sized; endostome segments ca. 1/4 the length of exostome teeth................... 7. A. solovjovii
4. Leaf apices grossly dentate....................................................................................2. A. dentatus
4. Leaf apices entire to subentire............................................................................................5
5. Stem leaves oblong-lingulate above; leaf cells minutely papillose....................................... 5. A. perlinguatus
5. Stem leaves lingulate above; leaf cells grossly papillose..........................................................6
6. Leaf bases auriculate...................................................................................................... 6. A. rugelii
6. Leaf bases not auriculate.......................................................................................................7
7. Branches attenuate at the apex; leaves widely ovate, shortly acute at the apex..............3. A. giraldii
7. Branches not attenuate at the apex; leaves ovate-lingulate, rounded at the apex........................8
8. Stems without central strand; leaves not fragile, ligulate, not sheathing at base, erect or imbricate, hardly contorted when dry..................................................................................................4. A. minor
8. Stems with central strand; leaves fragile, lance-ligulate from an ovate, somewhat sheathing base, more or less incurved-contorted when dry........................................................................8. A. thraustus
 
 
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