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Splachnaceae Grev. & Arn. Search in NYBG Virtual Herbarium Decrease font Increase font Restore font
 

Published In: Memoirs of the Wernerian Natural History Society 5: 442. 1824. (Mem. Wern. Nat. Hist. Soc.) Name publication detail
 

Project Name Data (Last Modified On 2/20/2009)
Acceptance : Accepted
Project Data     (Last Modified On 3/16/2009)
General Reference:

Notes     (Last Modified On 3/16/2009)
general taxon notes:

 

The Splachnaceae consist of seven genera in the world (Crosby et al. 2000). Two of the six genera, Gymnostomiella Fleisch. and Splachnobryum C. Müll., recognized by X.-J. Li (ed., 2000) in the Splachnaceae actually belong to Pottiaceae Schimp. and Splachnobryaceae A. Kop., respectively. Although these two genera superficially share similar plants growing on wet calcareous substrates and were placed together in the subfamily Splachnobryoideae of the Splachnaceae by Bartram (1939), P.-C. Chen et al. (1963), Fleischer (1923), and Gangulee (1974), they were excluded from the Splachnaceae by Koponen (1981), who treated Splachnobryum in its own family, Splachnobryaceae, and retained Gymnostomiella in the Pottiaceae. Such classification is generally accepted by many recent authors (Buck & Goffinet 2000; Crosby et al. 2000; Eddy 1990; Sharp, Crum & Eckel 1994; Zander 1993), and we recognize this treatment in the present study.

 

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SPLACHNACEAE
壶藓科   hu xian ke
by Gao Chien and Si He
 
Plants of alpine fens and high nitrogen, decaying organic substrates, small to rather robust, usually matted with more or less papillose rhizoids, gregarious or in dense tufts. Stems erect, branched by subfloral innovations, sparsely foliate on lower stems; central strand present. Leaves soft, broadly ovate to ovate-lanceolate or oblong to spatulate, acute to acuminate or rounded-obtuse at apex; margins plane, entire or serrulate to serrate; costa single, mostly reaching above the midleaf, sometimes percurrent to shortly excurrent; leaf cells lax, thin-walled, pale, hexagonal to rectangular or oblong, smooth, rarely papillose; lower cells elongate; alar cells not differentiated. Autoicous, rarely dioicous. Perigonia often subglobose or subdisciform, antheridia surrounded by filiform or clavate paraphyses. Perichaetia usually without paraphyses, perichaetial leaves scarcely differentiated from stem leaves. Setae elongate, erect, smooth; capsules erect, symmetric, usually with an elongate and inflated apophysis; stomata numerous; opercula convex or conic, rarely not differentiated; annuli absent; peristome single, with 16 teeth, distinctly keeled, cross-striate or papillose; columella often persistent, sometimes falling attached to opercula. Calyptrae mitrate, rarely cucullate. Spores spherical, smooth or papillose.
 

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1. Plants rigid; opercula not differentiated; calyptrae large, covering most of the capsule...................... 4. Voitia
1. Plants soft; opercula differentiated; calyptrae small, covering only operculum................................................ 2
2. Apophyses not broader and usually clearly narrower than the urns................................................ 2. Tayloria
2. Apophyses clearly broader than the urns........................3
3. Leaf apices shortly acuminate to cuspidate or obtuse; apophyses much broader than the urns, globose to turbinate or umbrellalike, clearly differentiated in size, shape, and color..................................... 1. Splachnum
3. Leaf apices slenderly acuminate; apophyses somewhat broader than the urns, not differentiated in color...........3. Tetraplodon
 
 
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