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Project Name Data (Last Modified On 1/11/2013)
 

Flora Data (Last Modified On 1/11/2013)
Genus ERYNGIUM L.
PlaceOfPublication Sp. P1. 232. 1753.
Description Biennial or perennial, usually glabrous herbs (our species) from stout taproots or rootstocks; stems (when present) prostrate to erect, simple or branched, the leaves mostly petiolate, entire to lobed or divided, usually spinose, the petiole sheathing; inflorescence of solitary to numerous involucrate heads, the flowers all perfect, white, blue, or purple, each subtended by an involucel (floral) bractlet, the petals with an inflexed, lobed to fimbriate apex, the calyx prominent, often spinescent; stylopodium lacking, the styles shorter than to exceeding the calyx, a carpophore lacking; fruit subterete, scaly or tuberculate, the ribs obsolete, the commissure broad, the vittae inconspicuous; seed subterete, its face flat or slightly concave.
Key Short-caulescent or acaulescent perennial from a taproot; leaves without callous margins, coarsely spinose-serrate; heads violet-blue, ovoid, the bracts 8-10, oblanceolate to ovate, chartaceous; calyx-teeth 1.5-2 mm. long; fruit-angles scaly, the faces papillose ................................................. 1. E. CARLINAE Caulescent, branched biennial from fibrcus, fascicled roots; leaves callous- margined, crenate to finely spinulose-serrate; heads greenish, cylindrical, the bracts 5-6, lanceolate, foliaceous; calyx-teeth 0.5 mm. long; fruit densely tawny-papillose on both angles and faces ......................................................... 2. E. FOETIDUM
Distribution Eryngium is probably the largest (200-250 species) and most distinctive genus of the family, with its commonly thistle-like aspect. The genus is essentially cosmopolitan, although tending to avoid East Asia, and tropical and South Africa.
 
 
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