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Published In: Observations sur la Physique, sur L'Histoire Naturelle et sur les Arts. 29: 55. 1786. (Jul 1786) (Observ. Phys.) Name publication detail
 

Project Name Data (Last Modified On 7/9/2009)
Acceptance : Accepted
Project Data     (Last Modified On 8/10/2009)

 

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75. Gaillardia Foug. (gaillardia, blanketflower)

Plants annual or perennial herbs, often with taproots. Stems erect or ascending, few- to many-branched, with fine longitudinal ridges and grooves, moderately to densely pubescent with curved or curled hairs, some of the hairs sometimes gland-tipped. Leaves alternate and sometimes also basal (all basal elsewhere), long-petiolate to sessile, the base sometimes slightly expanded or clasping the stem. Leaf blades oblanceolate to oblong or lanceolate, unlobed or with rounded pinnate lobes, angled or tapered to more or less rounded at the base, rounded or angled or tapered to a sharply or bluntly pointed tip, the margins otherwise entire, wavy or toothed, the surfaces densely pubescent with short, curved or curled hairs, also dotted with sessile to impressed glands, usually somewhat roughened to the touch. Inflorescences of solitary heads terminal on the branches, the heads appearing long-stalked. Heads radiate. Involucre cup-shaped to shallowly cup-shaped, the bracts in 2 or 3 subequal series. Involucral bracts 15–28, green with a sometimes yellowish base, inconspicuously 1-nerved, spreading to reflexed at flowering, lanceolate to ovate, sometimes somewhat concave, the surfaces and margins densely hairy and usually also glandular. Receptacle strongly convex, often somewhat enlarging as the fruits mature, the florets usually subtended by numerous bristles, these sometimes fused irregularly at the base, usually straw-colored, occasionally reduced to a network of low, irregular teeth. Ray florets 6–15 in 1 series (absent elsewhere), sterile (lacking stamens and style at flowering and with an ovary that is shorter and thinner than those of the disc florets, not developing into a fruit), the corolla relatively broad above a slender base, yellow or red, brownish red, or reddish purple, at least toward the base, the tubular portion and often also the ligule with dense, somewhat tangled hairs and also glandular, not persistent at fruiting. Disc florets 40 to numerous (more than 100), perfect, the corolla 4–7 mm long, yellow, orangish red, purple, or purplish brown, the tube not expanded at the base or persistent at fruiting, usually woolly toward the tip, the 5 sharply pointed lobes densely woolly. Style branches with the sterile tip long-tapered to a sharply pointed tip. Pappus of 6–10 scales, these with a somewhat thickened, orangish brown midnerve and thin, nearly transparent margins, the lanceolate to ovate basal portion tapered to a relatively long, awned tip. Fruits somewhat wedge-shaped, more or less 4-angled, the surface densely pubescent with relatively long, yellowish, ascending hairs, black. Fifteen to 18 species, North America, South America.

 

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1 1. Ray florets with the corollas yellow; disc florets with the corollas yellow; receptacle with the florets subtended by a network of low, irregular teeth ... 1. G. AESTIVALIS

Gaillardia aestivalis
2 1. Ray florets with the corollas red, brownish red, or reddish purple, sometimes yellowish toward the tip; disc florets with the corollas orangish red, purple, or purplish brown; receptacle with the florets subtended by numerous bristles ... 2. G. PULCHELLA Gaillardia pulchella
 
 
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